Breastfeeding

  • The Reality of Parenting

    Everywhere you turn there are resources to help expecting parents plan for their soon-to-be bundle of joy.  Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely love being a mom. Hands down, bringing two lives into this world have been my biggest accomplishments.  H O W E V E R, there are some things that I wasn’t prepared for that I wish I knew beforehand. 

     

    There will be no sugar coating here.  So, grab your favorite notepad because I’m sharing the raw and uncut version of what to really expect from parenthood. (more…)

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  • Public Nursing Now Legal in All 50 States – YAHOO!!!!!

    Last week, breastfeeding in public became legal in all 50 states. Hooray! We did it, ladies! While this is an amazing accomplishment and a step in the right direction for mother’s and women’s rights, surprisingly enough, it was still illegal for the longest time. Now, moms (finally) have laws and rights that specifically protect them from harassment while nursing in public. But that doesn’t stop the public from feeling offended or uncomfortable by this natural act.

     

    Back in July in Minnesota – a state that already has laws that protects nursing mothers – Stephanie Buchanan was at a public pool with her sister-in-law and her three-month-old son. Once Buchanan started to feed her son, she told CNN affiliate WCCO that “a patron came up, a lady, at the pool and told me that I needed to cover up because her sons were swimming”. She refused, and a few minutes later, was approached by an employee of the pool who asked her to go into a more private area. She again refused, and the police were called to the scene. Mary Davis, Buchanan’s sister-in-law shared her thoughts on the double standard of nursing to WCCO: “People have no problem seeing puppies feed from their mama […] But the minute mama’s breastfeeding, some people, it makes them uncomfortable. … They have a certain set of expectations how a mother should breastfeed” Buchanan protested this by organizing a “nurse-in” where hundreds of mothers across the state of Minnesota went to the pool to openly nurse in public. Buchanan also plans on filing a police report. Thankfully, she has the law on her side.

     

    Breasts only biologically exist to produce milk for nursing and feeding young children, but they have been so overly-sexualized by the media and the patriarchy that we as a society have completely forgotten their purpose. Breastfeeding in public has become so taboo because of societal beliefs and norms. Lawmakers have been afraid of legalizing public nursing because women would feel inclined to ”whip it out and do it anywhere” which was a popular belief back in 2003 and – believe it or not – was still a main factor in why it took so long to legalize this completely natural act.

     

    The last two states to pass the legislatures were Utah and Idaho. Utah Representative Curt Webb expressed his opinions during a hearing on the act. The Salt Lake Tribune picked it up: “This seems to say you don’t have to cover up at all. I’m not comfortable with that, I’m just not. It’s really in your face”. A Utah woman even talked to Buzzfeed News about her experience breastfeeding in public. She was excommunicated from her religion because the church leaders believed the act was sexualized and immodest. But it’s not sexualized and immodest, it’s a natural connection between mother and child; all mammals do it.  

     

    And this is exactly why Stephanie Buchanan protested her public pool. Some people today still believe that breastfeeding in public is an act of indecency. The fact of the matter is mothers can’t control when or where their kid gets hungry (they certainly wish they could, but this is not a perfect world). This is not an indecency issue. This is a sexism issue. Representative Paul Amador fought for the bill in Idaho’s state legislature and got it passed 66-0 with no debate or fight. He said to the House: “Personally, I find it disappointing that we’re in 2018 and we still haven’t passed this law in Idaho. I think we can take a proactive stance here through legislation to promote the natural bond and health benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child. I also believe the health and nutritional choices of our families are best left as decisions for our families, not our government”. Amador is a new father of a 5-month-old son, which may have helped sway his opinion on the issue.

     

    With this incredible and progressive landmark, we can only hope that the stigma of nursing in public will become a thing of the past. It is important that we educate those younger than us and let them know that nursing is not an act of indecency, instead, it actually creates and strengthens the natural and healthy bond between mother and child.

     

    MOMS, KNOW YOUR RIGHTS:

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  • First Year of Feeding

    Are you wondering when you can start your baby on more interesting foods? Look no further! We have all your answers right here in a month-by-month guide starting at breast milk/formula and ending in mac and cheese!

    Birth – 4 months

    Only feed your baby breast milk or formula – NO solid food at this time!

    Breast milk

    See “Breastfeeding Battle” to see how to know if your baby is getting enough milk.

    Formula

    A simple rule to follow for the first 4-6 months, according to babycenter.com is to give your baby 2.5 ounces of formula per pound of body weight. Therefore; if your baby is 6 pounds – you give about 15 ounces of formula in one 24-hour day. If your baby weighs 10 pounds – give them 25 ounces in the day, etc.

    Signs your baby is hungry

    Lip smacking, rooting (turning towards you), or putting hands to mouth.

    Your babies hungriest times take place during growth spurts, which occur during 10-14 days after birth, 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months.

    Signs your baby is overfed

    Vomiting after feeding (spitting up is completely normal, but vomiting is not), tummy pain, drawing legs up, or a tense tummy.

    If your baby is crying or whimpering – try changing their diaper, burping them, or some snuggle time before turning to a bottle.

    4 – 6 months

    Signs your baby is ready for solid food

    Can hold head up, sits upright in a high chair, doubled birth weight and weighs at least 13 pounds.

    What to feed?

    Pureed vegetables, pureed fruit, pureed meat, semi-liquid cereal, or small amounts of unsweetened yogurt (no cows milk until 12 months). Begin with 1 teaspoon of food mixed in with 4-5 teaspoons of breast milk or formula. Increase to 1 tablespoon of food with breast milk or formula gradually thickening the mixture over time. Wait 2-3 days in between foods so that you are offering new foods one at a time.

    6 – 8 months

    Signs your baby is ready for solid food

    Same as 4-6 months.

    What to feed?

    Same as months 4-6 plus strained fruits, strained vegetables, pureed tofu, pureed legumes. Begin with 1 teaspoon fruit or vegetables gradually increased to 2 or 3 tablespoons in four feedings or 3 to 9 tablespoons cereal in 2 or 3 feedings. Again, wait 2-3 days in between new foods to watch for signs of allergy.

    8 – 10 months

    Signs your baby is ready for finger foods

    Can pick up objects with thumb and forefinger, can transfer items from one hand to the other, puts things in mouth and can move jaw in a chewing motion.

    What to feed?

    Same as 6-8 months plus small amounts of pasteurized cheese, cottage cheese, mashed vegetables, mashed fruits, small bits of o-shaped cereal, scrambled eggs, pasta, small bits of meat and beans. ¼ – ¼ cup of dairy, ¾ – 1 cup of fruit or vegetables, 3-4 tablespoons of protein-rich food. Wait 2-3 days between new foods.

    10 – 12 months

    Signs your baby is ready for other solid foods

    Swallows food easily, has more teeth, doesn’t push food out of mouth and tries to use a spoon.

    What to feed?

    Same as 8-10 months plus bite sized pieces of fruits, vegetables, and combo foods like mac and cheese. ⅓ cup dairy, ⅛ – ¼ cup combo foods. Wait 2-3 days between new foods.

     

    Happy Feeding!!

     

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  • Breastfeeding Battle

    It’s a well-known fact that breastfeeding is great for your newborn baby. Although that is highly talked about, something that is a little less discussed is women who struggle to produce milk.

    Lactation Struggles

    According to fitpregnncy.com – the number one reason mothers stop breastfeeding is because they believe that they simply can’t produce enough milk for their babies’ health.

    While some women are empowered by watching their bodies nourish their babies, others lose confidence. If you perceive that you are not producing enough milk and therefore not allowing your baby to grow as fast as he or she can – the mother can lose confidence in herself very quickly.

    How can I re-gain my confidence in breastfeeding?

    Gaining confidence comes from proving to yourself that you are in fact producing enough milk. Two ways to prove this would be to –

    1. Weigh your baby before and after feeding to see if your baby is receiving the proper amount of nourishment or not.
    2. Keep track of the amount of diapers your baby wets throughout the day. According to babycenter.com it should be about six diapers.

    How can I produce more breast milk?

    If you notice your baby is not satisfied and your breasts are not softer after feeding you can try the following to produce more milk.

    1. Nurse and nurse frequently. Kellymom.com states that if the removal of breast milk does not take place every few hours, mom’s supply will begin to decrease.
    2. Avoid pacifiers so that all of the latching and sucking is done during feeding.
    3. Between feedings, pumping helps support the natural flow of milk all throughout the day so that there is a steady flow.

    When to stop –

    There is no age restriction. When it is too emotionally or physically painful for you to continue breastfeeding is when you should stop. Do not feel guilty moms. You are incredible, your body is incredible and your baby will be absolutely fine. Formula exists for this reason!

     

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