Family

  • Quarantine Edition: Parents Are Not Okay

     

    The effect of being quarantined at home with children has added another layer of stress to many   of our households, and quite frankly, some parents are not okay.  This is a time like no other.  We are all struggling to get through the days.  TGIF has turned into just another day of virtual learning, countless trips to the fridge and our names being called more than ever imaginable.

     

    A mother recently reached out disclosed that she was struggling with managing “EVERYTHING”.  She shared that since being placed under stay at home orders her stress level has gone through the roof, as she has been working full-time from home on her business, while cleaning, cooking, cleaning, figuring out virtual learning with her 5 children, changing diapers, giving baths, coordinating nap times and managing the emotional rollercoaster that comes along with a spouse who has recently been laid off.  

     

    Her plea for help really pulled at my heartstrings.  As a parent, I get it.  I’ve been there to some degree.  When my daughters were young, I stayed home with them.  I also started a small business so that I could continue to stay at home as they got older.  It was the hardest thing I’ve ever done.  Years later, I literally get a rush of a tension headache when I think about sitting at my desk in my home office trying to speak to employees on a conference call that I purposely scheduled during nap time, breastfeeding my newborn (ouch), while my two-year-old was running in circles, refusing to take a much-needed nap. Blink and it was dinner time.  It wouldn’t be fair to say that I can reasonably imagine how it would feel to add helping an elementary school-aged child with virtual learning assignments or not being able to have a reprieve at the local park. So, if you are an overwhelmed parent that is not okay while being quarantined, you are not alone and my heart goes out to you too.  

    If I might perhaps provide an alternate perspective, I’ll tell you that the more I speak to parents, the more I realize that our experiences of parenting while quarantined vary greatly dependent upon the ages of our children. I found that parents with children under the age of ten are extremely overwhelmed by the day-to-day effect of having to shelter in place.  While parents of children ten and above are oftentimes as overwhelmed,  our stressors vary slightly.  We also have the privilege of looking through a lens with hindsight vision.  


    So, for parents with multiple children who are trying to balance it all, many seem to really be struggling.  It’s important to lean on other parents who are going through what you’re going through or have gone through what you are experiencing in order to regain your footing.  Call, video conference or group chat with other parents and share your experience.  Some will have it worse.  Some will have it better.  Some will be at their wit’s end on Monday afternoon, others by Wednesday morning. 

     

    Last week, I had a three-hour conversation with another mom.  In the middle of the work-week.  Who does that?  We did because we both desperately needed it.  We needed a safe space to vent and recharge.  I Had dinner late that day.  Yep!  But who cares?  My family needed me to remain sane, so dinner was late.  No one starved and no one got the displaced wrath of this momma bear. I’d call that a win-win.  Wouldn’t you?

    While we all are staying home in order to keep our families, neighbors and front line heroes safe, it is possible to reclaim a sense of normalcy by getting out of the house, even for a moment.  If you’re fortunate enough to have your own yard, take time to enjoy it.  Make time to let the kids get out and play, run and use some of the energy that they would be expending at school during recess.  That’s why schools allow children to go out for recess even on cooler days.  Children have this amazing energy that needs to “get out”.  

    Flashback to my own two-year-old running around my home office.  Remember the varying perspective that I promised to offer?  When I was working from home with my newborn and toddler, I was so focused on trying to balance life as a perfect wife and super mom, that I oftentimes didn’t take advantage of the moment.   And, although at the time I had a graduate degree in psychology, was a certified school teacher, worked in a variety of daycare centers and schools with children of all ages; I was better prepared than most, I neglected to take a real step back.  Theoretically, I knew that I should’ve taken my two-year-old outside to run off the energy which would have led to her sleeping longer and sounder.  

    I’ll be completely honest, having two kids in two years, including a total of three months of stress that came along with doctor required bed rest over the two pregnancies and sleep deprivation like nobody’s business, makes one toss every last one of those child development books out of the window. Clearly, some common sense went out with it.  I’ll just blame it on the mommy-brain.  It’s a real thing, you know? 

    Seriously, get everyone out of the house.  Just let them take in the fresh air.  Don’t have a yard?  That’s fine, don’t leave the doorstep. Open the front door. Change rooms.  Move the kids from the back of the apartment to the front.  Just some way, somehow, shake things up.  If you feel like you’re losing it, imagine how they must feel with the purity of energy only a young child has and not being able to get it out.  

    Embrace the moment. We will never, ever get this time back.  The circumstances are horrible and we all wish that we could reset the clock back to the start of the new year, but we can’t.  What we can do is try to be positive and realize that this is all temporary.  

    The parents I speak to, like myself, with children over the age of 10 are stressed about going to the grocery store to feed their insatiable appetites, are worried about how this time of remote learning will affect applying to college later or how missing an entire season of sports will impact our children’s future.  However, as we are preparing them for their next phase of life, memories of their childhood become fainter. Many of us are envious of you.  Knowing that we’ll never get this time back is a reality that glares at us while in this stage of parenthood, we’re taking in the time we have left with our children before they leave the house.  No matter how hard things are, they will get better.  

    I needed to steal that three hours to talk to my friend.  They might need the same and may not realize it either.  You know what? Our breaks help everyone maintain their sanity in our household.  So, take a walk, alone, if you can.  My children are older now, so I make them run around our yard to get fresh air.  Sometimes, I’ll do it in the middle of the day during one of their virtual learning breaks. Do what you need to do to take care of yourself and your family.  Everything else will fall in place. 

    Your little ones will grow up and they will have actual memories or your pictures and videos to serve as memories.  I regret scheduling nap time conference calls instead of more time outside with my girls.  Create memories that you’d never thought you’d have.  Make the pillow fort that you don’t have time to make under regular circumstances. Break the schedule to enjoy PB&J outside.

    If you or someone you know is struggling during this pandemic, please click the link below for emergency and mental support. 

    COVID-19 RELIEF

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  • A Letter from our CEO regarding COVID-19

    Dear Clients + Staff,

    We hope you are all staying cautious and remaining healthy during this difficult time that is upon us. We know you may need assistance with childcare and education with the amount of business and school closures, but don’t worry, we will always have you covered. Kid Care Concierge is doing what we can to create balance and help with structure within households. Our KCC Team is working remotely and are doing what we can to assure that we give the best assistance possible.

    Please note that our first priority is health and safety for our clients and staff. We are asking for those who have been exposed to or have been in contact with someone who has contracted COVID-19 to please stay home/do not book a sitter. If you have requested or currently have assistance from our team, please cancel as soon as possible.

    We are asking that all clients and staff take the proper safety precautions during this time by washing your hands, staying clean and healthy, and simply have open communication with our team and clients.

    To help create balance, we have attached downloadable guides to better the household during this difficult time for you and your children. 

    For emergencies, cancellations, questions, comments, or concerns,

    please contact us directly at info@kidcareconcierge.com or 347.921.6821

    Please be stay safe and cautious.

    xo, Natasha Eldridge

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  • 4 Tips: Traveling with Children

    Who doesn’t love a vacation?  Vacationing is literally my favorite pastime. Take me to a warm beach and I’m a different kind of calm. Although I love vacationing, traveling to and from paradise can be overwhelming.  Life as a parent is stressful by nature. Traveling with babies and toddlers can be a disaster…if you don’t have a plan.

     

    The key to successful traveling with your young child lies within anticipating and planning around what might happen while en route. It’s imperative that you consider their typical schedule when booking your flight. Children need naps. Heck, some adults are cranky sans the nap.  It is really asking too much for a tired child to behave while trekking through the airport, standing in line for security checks, waiting for the adults in the party to be scanned, staying still while said adults put back on shoes, belts and collect belongs from the conveyor belt, go through customs, trek through the airport again to find the correct terminal and gate, sit there for an hour with parents who are hoping not to be delayed, stand in line to get on the plane, sit still while the adults maneuver getting their carry on luggage while ushering the kids out of the aisle before being trampled by folks rushing to the back of the plane and patiently wait for the plane to finally take off then sitting for about 4 hours to land, head to baggage claim and take a shuttle to the final destination.

     

    Does sound like a lot? Good, because it is.  Frankly, it’s a lot for everyone involved. This is especially true for a child under the age of 6.  

     

    1. If possible, book the flight around their naptime or bedtime (red-eye flights).

    I don’t care if I was traveling by plane or car, trips were scheduled to minimize bedtime disruption.  When I took my little ones from New York City to the Bahamas for the first time, we took a red-eye. They slept the entire time and my sanity was left intact.  I struggled a little with getting them and those darn rolling backpacks through the airport but considering everything else that could’ve gone wrong, that was a drop in the bucket.  Side note- Why do airports seem 1,000 times bigger when traveling with kids? You really do realize how tiny their little feet are when you’re attempting to rush and they just can’t keep up.   

     

    2. Book a window seat.  Mother nature is entertaining.

    Just trust me on this one.  Throw the shades up on a sunny day and a crying baby will be so amazed by the view that they’ll likely stop in their tracks. I still get mesmerized by the view so I get it.  If the little one isn’t as intrigued as I am, try engaging them by talking to them about what you’re seeing. “Oh Jordan, do you see that cloud? It looks like a doggie. Do you see one that looks like a fishie?”  That game can last for a long while if you’re willing to be creative.

     

     

    3. Book a seat near the front of the plane.

    Location. Location. Location. If the child is facing forward while crying in their seat, the noise will travel forward, disturbing fewer people. Remember life before kids? Looking at “those parents” wondering how on earth can they not control their crying kids at the restaurant or market? Fast forward to now and you not only wish you take back every glare you bestowed upon those poor parents but you will give the stare of death if passengers dare glance at you and your inconsolable child? It’s easy to get frazzled and unfocused if you have an entire plane staring at you.

    If passengers are annoyed, you won’t have to see them constantly looking back or shaking their heads in disbelief that a child is actually crying because his/her routine is thrown while stuck on a plane. Just focus on doing your best to comfort your child. Either they’ll likely join you in the “those parents” club one day too or they’ve forgotten how difficult traveling with small children can be for parents.  At any rate, it’s better to have annoyed passengers throw tantrums literally behind your back where you don’t have to deal with them or feel the need to constantly apologize for something beyond your control.

     

     

    4. Pack distractions.
    I’ve already exhausted you by taking you through a trip through a child’s eye. Pack their carry on bag accordingly.  Keep in mind that you will probably end up holding their carry-ons and yours. You might very well also end up carrying at least one child in addition to all of the bags if things don’t go according to plan. Be intentional about packing. Don’t just throw things into their bag.  

     

    Bring a variety of things to keep them engaged.  Pack the favorite teddy and toys that foster the use of the imagination without relying on technology.  You’ll have lots of time to play with them while in flight. 

     

    Preload your tablet or smartphone with their favorite movies. I never downloaded a movie on my iPad before I traveled with my daughters.  I found 3 very long child-friendly movies that they’ve both enjoyed in the past, 2 just as long movies that they’d never seen and splitter earphones so they could listen simultaneously. That was one of the smartest moves of my entire life! #winning

    Flying is no time to try new foods.  I don’t recall ever feeling satiated upon finishing a meal on an airplane.   Children are very cranky when they’re hungry. Do yourself a favor and pack their favorite foods. Feed them the perishable foods first, keeping in mind temperature and storage requirements.  The absolute last thing you need is a child with an upset stomach 35,000 feet in the air.

     

    The light at the end of the tunnel is that everything will be okay.  You will get through the trip to and from your destination.  You will create memories with your family.  It will be worth it.

    We’ve all been there and we’ve survived.  You will too. Happy travels!

     

     

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  • 5 Tips: Keeping Your Child Safe on the Internet

    I don’t know about you, but as a busy mother of two children, two years apart, life was nothing short of insane when they were preschool and elementary school age.  That was absolutely the most chaotic time of my life. I was in graduate school for educational psychology while pregnant with my oldest child and held a Master’s Degree and a graduate student in the School Psychology program when I was pregnant with my second child.  In other words, I spent both of my pregnancies being drilled about theories related to parenting, education, psychology. The dangers of overusing and even abusing technology to substitute active parenting were interwoven throughout most, if not all, of my graduate courses.  As a pregnant mom, my plan was to incorporate all that I learned in school with all that I learned from reading every parenting book I could get my hands on. (more…)

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