children

  • The Key to Making Good Parenting Decisions

    A few years into this parenting thing and most of have a moment, or a few, where we have a complete meltdown.   Like the ugly cry in the car type of meltdown. Hopefully, that car cry doesn’t take place in the carline while waiting for the kids to get out of school but it is bound to happen. As a parent, it is so hard to know if you’re making the “right” decisions for your children.

     

    The hope is that we will be perfect parents but the harsh reality is that there are no perfect parents.  I encourage you to stop torturing yourself by trying to be the parent you saw on television. Claire Huxtable and June Cleaver and were both great moms but I’m willing to bet that even their real-life parent life didn’t parallel that of their fictional characters.  

    —– NEED A GOOD ONE LINER AS AN INTRO HERE

    1. Every Child is Not the Same

    If you have more than one child then you may have already realized that siblings, heck even twins, can behave like polar opposites.  My daughters, two years apart, are similar in many ways but couldn’t be more different in other ways.

     

    If you think that you’ll be able to take a parenting guide, follow each outlined step in order and be able to parent each of your children in the same manner, please close the “manual” and walk away slowly because you’re in for a long ride.  What works for one child may not, and probably won’t, work for the other children in your family. As individuals, we each respond differently to stimuli. Accordingly, it’s important to keep that in mind as we attempt to make good parenting decisions.  

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  • The Reality of Parenting

    Everywhere you turn there are resources to help expecting parents plan for their soon-to-be bundle of joy.  Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely love being a mom. Hands down, bringing two lives into this world have been my biggest accomplishments.  H O W E V E R, there are some things that I wasn’t prepared for that I wish I knew beforehand. 

     

    There will be no sugar coating here.  So, grab your favorite notepad because I’m sharing the raw and uncut version of what to really expect from parenthood. (more…)

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  • 5 Steps to Helping Your Unhappy Child

     

    As parents,  we innately want to make our children happy.  We constantly walk a fine line between enabling and empowering, discipling and disregarding, etc. However, any parent will tell you that all of this easier said than done.  Thoughtful and intentional parenting is work, really hard work.  It takes another level of connectedness that can barely be explained.  Have you ever “felt” the pain of your child? When they hurt, you hurt. You’re elated when they are successful and beyond words when you feel like you’re unable to help them. That’s the level of connectedness that I refer to when I speak of thoughtful parenting.

     

    Temporary  Sadness vs. Unhappiness

    I’m not talking about my team just lost the game unhappy.  I’m referring to the type of unhappiness a child experiences when they feel as if they don’t ever fit in with peers or when they feel like they can never earn good grades regardless of how hard they’ve tried.  Watching our child feel lost, empty and downright unhappy, can feel like a punch in the gut. (more…)

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  • Easy Camp Lunches for Picky Eaters

    Parents, you know the drill:

    “That looks gross!”

    “That smells gross!”

    “I’m not eating that!”

    Being a picky eater is a natural part of childhood; most people outgrow it, but at this moment in your kid’s life, it’s the most important thing in the world. You’ve learned to control it – at home, at school, at a restaurant; but now – it’s the summer, which means one thing: camps are starting.

    Summer camps are a blessing, it lets kids be active, and you finally have time to get what you need to get done. But when dealing with a picky eater, you’ve entered a whole other world. During the school months, it’s easier. You’re dealing with a climate controlled atmosphere, and you have more leeway to pack foods that need to withstand the cold. But at a camp, you don’t know what you’re getting. It’s very likely that the only temperature controlled unit your child is getting is the tiny ice pack that you placed in the lunch box.

    So here you are,  panicking about what to feed your picky eater in a climate you can’t control.

    Here are some tips that will help you and your child have a happy and productive summer:

    1) Set up a no-no list:

    Sit down with your kid and together, the two of you can plan out lunches that they will enjoy, and that their friends will be envious of.

    2) Contact the camp:

    By doing this, you’ll be able to find out what foods aren’t allowed due to allergy restrictions, and what the camp does with the lunches (I went to a summer camp that would collect the lunch bags at the beginning of the day, and store them in a giant refrigerator until lunchtime).

    3). Try to change it up:

    Sure, peanut butter and jelly every day would be super easy. Unfortunately, pallets change, and sometimes eating the same thing for lunch every day can become routine and a chore. Try to come up with a lunch of the week. Each week of the camp there’s something different to eat. This will keep your child’s interest and enthusiasm up, and it won’t add any additional pressure on you to keep buying new lunch ingredients every day.

    4) Follow the camp’s policies:

    If there’s a no nut rule, stick with it; you don’t want to put the other campers in danger or get your kid in trouble for breaking the rule. If climate control is an issue, try adapting the lunches to stick with it. Pasta salads with oil-based dressings are a great solution, they can easily adapt to any type of temperature. Same with bean salads, hummus, veggies, and some deli meats and cheeses (from Stretcher.com). Always make sure to throw an ice pack inside the bag for extra coldness.

    5) Involve your camper:

    Have them make the lunches with you! It’s a great bonding activity, it will save time, and it will show your picky eater exactly what is going into their food (from Stretcher.com).

    Summer should be a low-stress time in you and your child’s life. Camps are great fun, and a great way to make sure that your kids are being active during the summer. You want your child to have the best time, don’t let their pickiness get in the way of the best summer ever!

     

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